Sunday, June 23, 2019

What is the worst way to get PTSD?

The deepest dashboard

PTSD Patrol
Kathie Costos
June 23, 2019

Why do responders suffer a deeper level of PTSD? Is it because they are exposed over and over again to traumatic events? Or is it because they have the "one time too many" hit them?

After decades of research, it became clear that for responders, it is more about the strength of their emotional core that makes causes the hardest hit.

It is the reason I became a Chaplain back in 2008. I trained to respond to responders knowing that the very thing inside of them causing them to take on those jobs, also caused them the greatest harm.

Oh, no, not all bad news, because that same emotional core holds the power to heal.
This video was done for National Guards and Reservist...the IFOC gave me an award for it because they were using it to help police officers and firefighters. It is called PTSD I Grieve for that reason.
It is nice to be proven right but it also grieves me to my own core. How is it that I was right all these years...but no one would listen?
A study on veterans and PTSD from Norway was released today and the evidence should be clear to anyone trying to change the road our veterans and reponders have been on for far too long.
“A lot of soldiers told stories of how witnessing someone else’s suffering, especially of children who became victims of the war, were tough to work through.” Andreas Espetvedt Nordstrand

For Veterans, Witnessing Suffering Can Mean Worse PTSD


PsychCentral
By Traci Pedersen
Associate News Editor
23 Jun 2019

A study of Norwegian veterans who served in Afghanistan finds that being exposed to the death and suffering of others tends to result in worse symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than being put in life-threatening situations.

The study, published in the European Journal of Psychotraumatology, is part of a comprehensive survey of how veterans are faring after the war in Afghanistan. Just over 7,000 Norwegian soldiers participated in the war in Afghanistan between 2001 and 2011, and 4,053 of them participated in this research.

Trauma is roughly divided into danger-based and non-danger-based stressors. Both types of stressors lead to an increase in PTSD, an anxiety disorder which can involve being hyper-alert, jumpy, sleeping poorly and reliving events after they’ve happened.
read more here


To change the outcome, we have to change the conversation. #BreakTheSilence and tell them TakeBackYourLife

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I'll revisit this endeavor, but for now...that's all folks!

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